1
Gary R Hammerslag: Footwear lacing system. BOA Technology, Knobbe Martens Olson & Bear, September 18, 2001: US06289558 (211 worldwide citation)

Disclosed is a footwear lacing system comprising a lace attached to a tightening mechanism. The lace is threaded through a series of opposing guide members positioned along the top of the foot and ankle portions of the footwear. The lace and guide preferably have low friction surfaces to facilitate ...


2
Frank B Griswold: Instep protector for safety shoes. Shanley O Neil and Baker, November 4, 1980: US04231170 (174 worldwide citation)

A safety shoe instep guard of compound curvature conforming generally to the shape of the human instep is constructed as an integral part of the shoe or secured to the shoe adjacent at least the lower end of the guard and extends upwardly from the region of the toes. The guard includes a plurality o ...


3
Adam H Oreck: Shoe having lace tubes. Steven E Kahm, April 25, 2000: US06052921 (172 worldwide citation)

This invention relates to a shoe having an ergometric shoe lace design. The laces pass through tubes on the tongue portion of the shoe and extend down to the sole of the shoe on either side of the shoe where they pass through tubes on or near the perimeter of the sole. The laces criss cross the foot ...


4
Gary R Hammerslag: Footwear lacing system. Knobbe Martens Olson & Bear, August 10, 1999: US05934599 (172 worldwide citation)

A footwear lacing system comprises a lace attached to a tightening mechanism. The lace is threaded through a series of opposing guide members positioned along the top of the foot and ankle portions of the footwear. The lace and guide preferably have low friction surfaces to facilitate sliding of the ...


5
William Cass: Article of footwear. Nike, Banner & Witcoff, February 29, 2000: US06029376 (170 worldwide citation)

An article of footwear including a sole and an upper for enclosing and supporting the foot. The upper includes a tongueless outer sleeve of flexible woven elastic material, such as spandex, that allows the outer sleeve to expand and contract around a foot of a wearer. A flexible cage of support elem ...


6
Dezider Krajcir, Dezi A Krajcir: Safety shoe. McConnell and Fox, March 20, 1990: US04908963 (168 worldwide citation)

A safety shoe including a metatarsal guard comprising a molded plastic arch extending across the metatarsal area supported at each of its ends on the sole and consisting of a number of ribs hinged to each other, the whole being laminated into the upper of the shoe.


7
Hans R Scherz: Safety boot. Swabey Mitchell Houle Marcoux & Sher, January 4, 1983: US04366629 (164 worldwide citation)

A safety waterproof boot of molded plastics material is provided having an integral sole and upper, the upper including a toe portion and a metatarsal portion, a metallic plate provided in the sole portion and extending the width and length thereof and allowing for longitudinal flexing of the sole, ...


8
Ming Che Hong, Ching K Wu, Martin Lee: Shoe with detachable toe cover. Zarley McKee Thomte Voorhees & Sease, February 26, 1991: US04995174 (163 worldwide citation)

A shoe with a placement track on the front perimeter of its sole which slidably receives a toe cover in it. The toe cover includes a sheath or covering portion and a rim portion. The rim portion has apertures at its ends in order to receive and engage with securement wedges at the ends of said place ...


9
Michael W Schmohl: Continuous sole for sports shoe. Uniroyal, Philip Rodman, May 12, 1981: US04266349 (137 worldwide citation)

A continuous outsole for a sports shoe has a profile pattern characterized by a first large circular pattern section at the area of the ball of the foot and a second large circular pattern section at the heel area. Each large circular pattern section has a center point that is disposed substantially ...


10
Francis Denu: Sole for footwear, especially sports footwear. Adidas Fabrique de Chaussures de Sport, Brisebois & Kruger, December 26, 1978: US04130947 (125 worldwide citation)

A sole for footwear, especially sports footwear, has a lower layer provided with transverse ribs and an upper shock-absorbing layer. The lower layer may be of natural rubber of Shore hardness from 55 to 60 and the upper layer of lower-density natural or synthetic rubber of Shore hardness about 40.



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