1
John C Dyer, Thomas A DesMarais, Gary D LaVon, Keith J Stone, Gregory W Taylor, Gerald A Young: Thin-unit-wet absorbent foam materials for aqueous body fluids and process for making same. The Procter & Gamble Company, Eric W Guttag, E Kelly Linman, February 7, 1995: US05387207 (473 worldwide citation)

Relatively thin, collapsed, i.e. unexpanded, polymeric foam materials that, upon contact with aqueous body fluids, expand and absorb such fluids, are disclosed. A process for consistently obtaining such relatively thin, collapsed polymeric foam materials by polymerizing a specific type of water-in-o ...


2
Thomas A DesMarais, Keith J Stone, Hugh A Thompson, Gerald A Young, Gary D LaVon, John C Dyer: Absorbent foam materials for aqueous body fluids and absorbent articles containing such materials. The Procter & Gamble Company, Eric W Guttag, November 9, 1993: US05260345 (457 worldwide citation)

Disclosed are absorbent foam materials suitable for use as or in the absorbent cores of absorbent articles, such as diapers which absorb and retain aqueous body fluids. Such foam materials comprise hydrophilic, flexible open-celled structures which are preferably prepared by polymerizing high intern ...


3
Stephen A Goldman, Herbert L Retzsch, Todd L Mansfield: Absorbent members for body fluids having good wet integrity and relatively high concentrations of hydrogel-forming absorbent polymer having high porosity. The Proctor & Gamble Company, Eric W Guttag, Carl J Roof, E Kelly Linman, October 8, 1996: US05562646 (304 worldwide citation)

Absorbent members useful in the containment of body fluids such as urine, that have at least one region containing hydrogel-forming absorbent polymer in a concentration of from about 60 to 100% by weight and providing a gel-continuous fluid transportation zone when in a swollen state. This hydrogel- ...


4
Stephen A Goldman, Nancy A Haynes, Todd L Mansfield, Manfred Plischke, Herbert L Retzsch, Trevor Walker, Gerald A Young: Absorbent members for body fluids having good wet integrity and relatively high concentrations of hydrogel-forming absorbent polymer. The Procter & Gamble Company, Eric W Guttag, Carl J Roof, E Kelly Linman, February 4, 1997: US05599335 (260 worldwide citation)

Absorbent members useful in the containment of body fluids such as urine, that have at least one region containing hydrogel-forming absorbent polymer in a concentration of from about 60 to 100% by weight and providing a gel-continuous fluid transportation zone when in a swollen state. This hydrogel- ...


5
Stephen Allen Goldman, Nancy Ann Haynes, Todd Leon Mansfield, Manfred Plischke, Herbert Louis Retzsch, Trevor Walker, Gerald Alfred Young: Absorbent members for body fluids having good wet integrity and relatively high concentrations of hydrogel-forming absorbent polymer. The Procter & Gamble Company, Carl J Roof, Eric W Guttag, E Kelly Linman, September 23, 1997: US05669894 (226 worldwide citation)

Absorbent members useful in the containment of body fluids such as urine, that have at least one region containing hydrogel-forming absorbent polymer in a concentration of from about 60 to 100% by weight and providing a gel-continuous fluid transportation zone when in a swollen state. This hydrogel- ...


6
James M Vander Meer: Detergent compositions containing ethoxylated amines having clay soil removal/anti-redeposition properties. The Proctor & Gamble Company, Eric W Guttag, Steven J Goldstein, Richard C Witte, July 1, 1986: US04597898 (184 worldwide citation)

Detergent compositions which comprise from about 0.05 to about 95% by weight of a water-soluble ethoxylated amine having clay soil removal/anti-redeposition properties. These compounds are selected from ethoxylated monoamines, ethoxylated diamines, ethoxylated polyamines, ethoxylated amine polymers ...


7
Jeffery T Cook, Glen R Lash, Danny R Moore, Gerald A Young: Absorbent structures containing stiffened fibers and superabsorbent material. The Procter & Gamble Company, Eric W Guttag, November 1, 1994: US05360420 (136 worldwide citation)

Absorbent structures having a fluid acquisition/distribution layer with an average dry density of less than about 0.30 g/cc, an average density upon wetting with 1.0% NaCl aqueous solution of less than about 0.20 g/cc, and an average dry basis weight from about 0.001 to about 0.10 g/cm.sup.2 ; and a ...


8
Thomas Allen DesMarais, Keith Joseph Stone, John Collins Dyer, Bryn Hird, Stephen Allen Goldman, Paul Seiden: Absorbent foam materials for aqueous fluids made from high internal phase emulsions having very high water-to-oil ratios. The Procter & Gamble Company, Eric W Guttag, Carl J Roof, E Kelly Linman, July 22, 1997: US05650222 (113 worldwide citation)

Low density collapsed absorbent foams materials that, upon contact with aqueous fluids, in particular urine, can expand and absorb these fluids. These low density foams typically have an expanded thickness from about 6 to about 10 times the thickness of the foams in their collapsed state. These low ...


9
Gerald A Young, Danny R Moore, Jeffrey T Cook: Absorbent structures containing superabsorbent material and web of wetlaid stiffened fibers. The Procter & Gamble Company, Leonard W Lewis, Eric W Guttag, E Kelly Linman, June 8, 1993: US05217445 (106 worldwide citation)

Absorbent structures having a wetlaid fluid acquisition/distribution layer with an average dry density of less than about 0.30 g/cc, an average density upon wetting with 1.0% NaCl aqueous solution of less than about 0.20 g/cc, and an average dry basis weight from about 0.001 to about 0.10 g/cm.sup.2 ...


10
Glen R Lash: Absorbent structures containing thermally-bonded stiffened fibers and superabsorbent material. The Procter & Gamble Company, George W Allen, Carl J Roof, Eric W Guttag, July 2, 1996: US05531728 (105 worldwide citation)

Absorbent structures having a fluid acquisition/distribution layer with an average dry density of less than about 0.30 g/cc, an average density upon wetting with 1.0%, NaCl aqueous solution of less than about 0.20 g/cc, and an average dry basis weight from about 0.001 to about 0.10 g/cm.sup.2 ; and ...



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